So it’s been 6 months since I breathed life into the machine I’ve come to know and I’m immensely pleased with this project. For me it represents the culmination of several skills I’ve picked up over the years, and there’s still much to learn (can’t wait). There’s something really gratifying about turning a stack of parts and instructions into something that actually works. I guess anything one builds with their own two hands takes on special sentiment.

The “CustoMac Mini 2011” is probably the easiest hackintosh project for beginners, all due of course to the good work of people like tonymacx86, MacMan, toleda, notshy, and a host of others. The price is low and the rewards are many. Sure I’ve had a few hiccups, but nothing catastrophic (yet). Read the rest of this entry »

Success! After a month of trial and error (and more error), I’ve finally found a way to reliably turn on Trinity over the internet. Wake-on-LAN—you know, that feature where your computer’s onboard ethernet adapter listens to the internet for a magic packet of data telling it to wake up your computer. Why do I want to do this? I want to access Trinity on the go and on command via LogMeIn, without running her 24/7. That wouldn’t be very green now would it? I was really close after reading a guide on lifehacker, but somehow I couldn’t crack it. I could only achieve my goal from within my own wireless network at home, not very useful when I cross the pond. It seems after a period of about thirty minutes, dormant devices disappear from the router’s ARP cache, making it invisible to magic packet bursts sent from the outside of your home network (or so I’ve read). The solution? I needed better tools.

The stock Linksys firmware of my WRT54GS2 is ok, but it lacks several advanced features, mainly WOL. TomatoUSB is free*, open source firmware, written by third parties giving you greater control of your router’s settings and capabilities. I’ve heard good things about DD-WRT, it seems to reign in popularity, but TomatoUSB is a bit simpler to install so—yea, I went with TomatoUSB. The great thing about it is there’s a WOL feature built right into the interface. Simply log into the router, click the “WOL” heading, find your machine, and click on it to wake it up. Easy peasy. It seems the trick to doing this from outside your network is setting up remote access to your router. Doing so requires knowing your external IP address, the one given to you by your ISP [You can check it at whatsmyip.org]. The other problem with that is, sometimes they change it without telling you, and if you’re not at home to spot the address change you’ll be essentially locked out. No matter, that problem has been solved.

Want to know how to do this for yourself? Read the rest of this entry »

When I got my first BlackBerry, countless years ago, one of the features the annoying sales rep was trying to push was that Hotspot@Home garbage. You know, where T-Mobile (I guess I’m outing myself) gives you a wireless router and you use it to make “unlimited” Wi-Fi calls in your home, and on your handset for an additional $10/month fee. Little did he know I did my reading and knew that I didn’t need that BS. The Curve 8900 came with the UMA feature that let’s you connect to T-Mobile’s services from ANY Wi-Fi connection that supported it. Yea sure it would use my monthly minute allotment, but I was planning to join the cheapskate “MyFavs + Google Voice = Unlimited Calling plan. Suckers. Read the rest of this entry »

%d bloggers like this: