—Youtube user Dean Wray has a series of in-depth tutorials on a deeper understanding of hackintoshing. This has saved me more times than I can count. It’s good to have incremental backups, but also various copies of your boot.plist and DSDT.aml files should you run into any issues. With this video you can go in and tweak/replace these key files and get your machine back up and running without reinstalling the entire OS (which I have also done more times than I can count Read the rest of this entry »

You know the saying… When I upgraded to the latest version of OS X (10.7.4) I brilliantly forgot to rollback Toleda’s audio kexts which made HDMI audio possible. I have copies so I could replace them, but in addition to HDMI audio I also want to enable all the other port & jacks ie: headphones, microphone, line out. You know, make this thing more functional. Pshh, can’t be that hard right? Read the rest of this entry »

I have to say, in all my years of conflict with Apple, the designer/technophile in me feels a connection to their hardware. Just look at any of iFixit’s teardowns of late, and you can see how chaos is brought to order. No it’s not the products I have a problem with, just the company’s stance on certain things, and the way they slant information to the not so savvy in order to benefit their public appeal. I also grew to hate fanboy-ism, which… seems to be an Apple thing. (Seriously get a life)

Growing up, my biggest Apple repellent was incompatibility. It really wasn’t a choice. It just so happened that I was born into a world/region that used Windows. So naturally, that’s what I got used to. And being that most of the world used Windows, it kind of made the case for the Mac a little weak. The Macs I got exposed to in my youth didn’t have enough for me. They were cute, but not very useful, so I went on about my days mostly ignoring them. How ironic that a platform whose biggest detractor was a lack of applications, would one day be the world leader in mobile “apps”. Kudos. Read the rest of this entry »

Oh RIM, ever since I jumped on the smartphone bandwagon four years ago I reveled in this wonderful new ability to get things done on-the-go. I still remember the feeling as I took my Curve 8900 home for the first time. Coming from a RAZR, it felt like I had magic at my fingertips. I mean, it had a qwerty keyboard for crying out loud. Ever the frugalist, I entrusted RIM with the task of being my sole internet provider as wi-fi wasn’t abundant (or rather I was too cheap for a faster ISP). In a pinch I could tether my Curve to Silvia for a quick email, or a light web browsing session. Sure it was slow, but I was “mobile”. Yup, Silvia and “Odie” (yes I name everything) made a great team. Then something happened.

As a tinkerer, and someone who generally likes to unlock new potential in older things, I became wrapped up in the world of beta software. Every now and then they’d add something new to appease my boredom, but nothing really wowed me. By this time I’m sure the iPhone debuted, and I found my phone spinning its wheels trying run all these newfangled apps RIM was trying to catch up with (hourglass reference). I even found myself under attack because of what phone I was wielding. Which was odd to me, I never thought of a tool as an outward expression of self. After installing beta OS after beta OS, it became clear that BlackBerry wasn’t gonna rule. At first I tried to deny it, focusing on the utilitarian and even minimalist qualities in the experience. Less is more. Less distraction, more productivity. Once I got a taste of broadband, I needed more speed. And I had hoped I could get it from RIM.

“Hope is the denial of reality” —Margaret Weis

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(image credit: Dennis Novak/Getty Images)

It’s quite the conundrum. You don’t have a Mac. You’re eager to install Lion on your hackintosh but it requires purchasing and installing Snow Leopard, only to then purchase and upgrade to Lion(???). Like me, you don’t want to pay for two operating systems when you’re only interested in the fresh new hotness Lion has to offer. The official OS X Lion USB Thumb Drive is $69 before tax (ouch), and like a good student of tonymacx86, you want an all-in-one bootable USB thumb drive with everything you need to set up Lion and maintain it (à la UniBeast).

I wrestled with this for a bit. I knew I wanted a “legitimate” copy of Lion for my hackintosh, as ironic as that sounds, but it just didn’t make sense buying two operating systems just to get the one I really wanted. And since all I had were Windows systems, I needed some google inspiration… Read the rest of this entry »

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