—Youtube user Dean Wray has a series of in-depth tutorials on a deeper understanding of hackintoshing. This has saved me more times than I can count. It’s good to have incremental backups, but also various copies of your boot.plist and DSDT.aml files should you run into any issues. With this video you can go in and tweak/replace these key files and get your machine back up and running without reinstalling the entire OS (which I have also done more times than I can count Read the rest of this entry »

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So it’s been 6 months since I breathed life into the machine I’ve come to know and I’m immensely pleased with this project. For me it represents the culmination of several skills I’ve picked up over the years, and there’s still much to learn (can’t wait). There’s something really gratifying about turning a stack of parts and instructions into something that actually works. I guess anything one builds with their own two hands takes on special sentiment.

The “CustoMac Mini 2011” is probably the easiest hackintosh project for beginners, all due of course to the good work of people like tonymacx86, MacMan, toleda, notshy, and a host of others. The price is low and the rewards are many. Sure I’ve had a few hiccups, but nothing catastrophic (yet). Read the rest of this entry »

I sort of did it before with Silvia; triple booting Ubuntu 10.04, the original Windows XP installation that came with her, and Windows 7 Enterprise just for the heck of it all on one drive. GRUB handled the selection process on startup, and after tweaking the countdown timer I was pleased with it. Doing something similar with a hackintosh on the first try was an ambitious idea (if I do say so myself), but I wanted one machine to rule them all.

I suspected that getting three of today’s major platforms to play nice together on one drive was going to be a serious headache. It would probably be much simpler to use a separate hard drive for each OS, but that would be rather boring wouldn’t it? Plus I only had one drive and, with the recent flooding in Thailand, purchasing another one was kind of out of the budget. Tony put up a guide on dual booting, but adding Ubuntu was a big question mark. Once again, lifehacker proved itself to be an invaluable resource. Read the rest of this entry »

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